It was the worst of times'

- Charles Dickens

The Beautiful Good Old Past

A gone era of gentlemen, ladylike women, class in any class, respect, cosiness, romance, solidarity, personal succes, and beauty.✟✡

Any submits, questions? Don't be afraid to ask, send me a telegram. I'll answer everything. I follow blogs I like.

Paradis Sauvage Foreign Lands
whiskey-in-a-teacup:

What you don’t know going in is that when you come out, you will be scarred for life. Whether you were in for a week, a month, or a year—even if you come home without a scratch—you are never, ever going to be the same. -Bill Guarnere

fybandofbrothers:

We didn’t figure we had a chance to come home. We thought “Well hell, the war is just starting and christ, we’re 50% gone now. So it’s a long haul”

(via flash-gordon-mostly)

mad-dogs-and-englishmen:

Arnhem 17 - 25 September 1944: A group of survivors from the Arnhem Operation arriving at Nijmegen after the evacuation and having their first drink. One of them, Captain Jan Linzel (second from left) is a member of the Dutch Royal Navy attached to No 10 Commando.
mad-dogs-and-englishmen:


Arnhem 17 - 25 September 1944: British paratroops being marched away by their German captors. Some 6,400 of the 10,000 British paratroops who landed at Arnhem were taken prisoner, a further 1,100 had been killed. (German photograph)
awhodareswinsfan:

Paratroopers of 1st Airborne Division Signals gather on the drop zone west of Arnhem, 17 September 1944.
(IWM)
mad-dogs-and-englishmen:


Nijmegen and Grave 17 - 20 September 1944: Allied trucks carrying munitions and supplies across the bridge over the Waal River at Nijmegen bridge under German shellfire.
mad-dogs-and-englishmen:


17 September 1944: An aerial view of a C-47 Dakota as it tows off a CG-4A Waco glider from a British airfield en route for Holland.
mad-dogs-and-englishmen:


Arnhem 17 - 25 September 1944: Four British paratroops clamber ashore from a small rowing boat at Nijmegen. They were captured at the Van Limburg Stirum School alongside Arnhem Bridge and taken to a transit camp at Emmerich in Germany, but escaped and found a rowing boat, in which they made their way down the Rhine and into the Waal to Nijmegen and freedom. Left to right: Cpl John Humphreys, Cpl Charles Weir, Lt Dennis Simpson, and Captain Eric Mackay, all of the 1st Para Squadron, Royal Engineers; they are shown here recreating the moment of their arrival at Nijmegen for the camera.
mad-dogs-and-englishmen:


Arnhem 17 - 25 September 1944: Four British paratroops clamber ashore from a small rowing boat at Nijmegen. They were captured at the Van Limburg Stirum School alongside Arnhem Bridge and taken to a transit camp at Emmerich in Germany, but escaped and found a rowing boat, in which they made their way down the Rhine and into the Waal to Nijmegen and freedom. Left to right: Cpl John Humphreys, Cpl Charles Weir, Lt Dennis Simpson, and Captain Eric Mackay, all of the 1st Para Squadron, Royal Engineers; they are shown here recreating the moment of their arrival at Nijmegen for the camera.
mad-dogs-and-englishmen:


Nijmegen and Grave 17 - 20 September 1944: Dutch children greet paratroopers of the 82nd (US) Airborne Division shortly after they landed near Nijmegen.
mad-dogs-and-englishmen:


Arnhem 17 - 25 September 1944: A German infantry battalion on alert as they search the suburbs of Arnhem for Allied troops. (German Photograph).
mad-dogs-and-englishmen:


17 September 1944: Six American paratroopers of the First Allied Airborne Army receive a final briefing from their commanding officer before emplaning.
mad-dogs-and-englishmen:


HQ of 1st Airlanding Light Regiment, Royal Artillery, unload a jeep and trailer from their Horsa glider at the landing zone near Wolfheze in Holland, 17 September 1944.
mad-dogs-and-englishmen:


British paratroopers from 1st Airborne Division enter a USAAF C-47 transport aircraft at the start of Operation ‘Market Garden’, 17 September 1944.
awhodareswinsfan:

Men of 1st Parachute Battalion in action at Arnhem during Operation ‘Market Garden’, 17 September 1944. 
(IWM)